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Ask the Expert: How will the recently published SSF Ocular Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sjögren’s affect you

Posted on Fri, Nov 11, 2016

Question_and_Answer-1.jpg"How will the recently published Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) for Ocular Management affect my next visit to my eye care professional?"

The recently published SSF Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management of Sjögren’s were developed to provide evidence-based recommendations for physicians and eye-care providers to advise a logical sequence of treatment options for dry eye. One aspect of the recommendations was to describe methods of grading the severity of dry eye disease and basing therapy on severity and the patient’s response to previous therapy. The guidelines also put into perspective some of the recently developed techniques for diagnosing dry eye and monitoring therapy.

Many of the measures described in the report have been used by practitioners in previous therapy of dry eye, but some of the newer options may not yet have been incorporated into all eye care practices and the described system of grading severity may be new to some practices. Therefore, the effect of the published guidelines may have different implications to different patients.

Your physician or eye care provider may discuss some of the newer options for diagnosis and grading of severity in particular cases. This will probably be true for the testing of tear osmolarity and testing for presence of the inflammation marker MMP-9, as those new tests are of assistance in grading severity of dry eye and recommending treatment options, as well as monitoring the effect of some treatments. Some of the recommendations for such testing may depend upon availability of the in-office tests and whether the symptoms or signs of dry eye have changed in particular patients. The provider may advise additional testing or a change in therapy, but not all patients will require such testing or altered treatment.

The treatment options recommended by a patient’s care provider will depend upon the severity of dry eye disease and the response to previous therapy as well as any existing contraindications to particular treatment options. It also is important to remember that these are recommended guidelines and not mandatory standards of care for all patients with dry eye. The clinical evaluation and overall assessment of each individual patient determines appropriate management as well as the cost/benefit balance for any given patient.

Click here to view the U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines  for Ocular Management in Sjögren’s  

by Gary N. Foulks, MD
Co-Chair of the Ocular Working Group for the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee
 

This information was first printed in The Moisture Seeker, SSF's member newsletter.

Click here to learn more about the SSF Sjögren’s Clinical Practice Guidelines initiative   

Topics: Dry Eyes, Sjogren's, Treatment, coping with sjogren's, Ask the Expert, Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management, Clinical Practice Guidelines

Managing Sjögren’s Vasculitis

Posted on Sun, Oct 30, 2016

Ask the Expert:
“How can I manage my vasculitis so that it doesn’t become too severe?”

Vasculitis usually manifests with purplish skin lesions on the legs and sometimes the trunk. It is usually associated with high levels of gammaglobulin in the serum. The skin may become easily irritated and even break down in areas where numerous lesions develop. The skin around the ankles is most susceptible. Skin break-down and ulcerations may form.

Although severe vasculitis from Sjögren’s may require hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), oral corticosteroids and immunosuppressive medications, milder forms can be managed with simple conservative measures.

TMS October 2016.pngSkin breakdown occurs with greater frequency when there is fluid accumulation around the ankles so measures that minimize edema (excess fluid accumulation) in the legs can be helpful. Such measures include elevation of the legs and the use of support hose. When sitting, your legs should be propped up on a chair and not left dangling for too long. Support hose to control edema should be of the above-knee variety. Hose that bunch up below the knee may actually act like a tourniquet and impede blood ow in the legs making edema worse.

Mild trauma to the skin of the legs can also favor skin ulceration so wearing pants may provide an extra layer of protection. Edema can also be controlled with diuretics. Some patients with vasculitis may benefit from low dose aspirin to keep the blood vessels open.

Of course these conservative measures should also be applied in instances when immunosuppressive therapy is needed. Consult with your doctor if diuretic therapy or low dose aspirin is right for you.

by Herbert S. B. Baraf, MD, FACP, MACR

This information was first printed in The Moisture Seeker, SSF's member newsletter.

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Topics: Plaquenil, Sjogren's, Treatment, Dry Skin, Immunosuppressant, Ask the Expert, Hydroxychloroquine, Vasculitis

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Oral Management in Sjögren’s Patients: Caries Prevention

Posted on Mon, Oct 10, 2016

The Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) has developed the first-ever U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Caries Prevention in Sjögren’s to ensure quality and consistency of care for the assessment and management of patients.

The SSF Clinical Practice Guidelines for Caries Prevention in Sjögren’s patients will help dentists, oral medicine specialists and Sjögren’s disease patients determine the best strategies for preventing caries due to dry mouth. The SSF Oral Working Group stresses that identification of potential Sjögren’s patients within the clinical practice is paramount for ensuring proper monitoring, timely treatment, prevention of serious complications, and referral to other specialists who can monitor and manage non-oral aspects of this disease.

Six years ago, the SSF initiated the development of clinical guideline recommendations for medical practitioners in three categories: rheumatology, oral medicine/dentistry, and ocular management. These will help to standardize patient care by giving physicians a roadmap of how to treat and manage their Sjögren's patients. 

Click here to view the SSF Caries Prevention Guidelines Summary and Recommendations.

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The SSF Sjögren’s Clinical Practice Guidelines initiative is funded fully by the SSF with no corporate or pharmaceutical industry support. The SSF would like to thank our committee chairmen and members of the oral working group for volunteering their time and expertise to develop these guidelines. We would also like to thank all SSF members and our generous supporters for helping to make the dream of Sjögren’s Clinical Practice Guidelines start to become a reality!  Click here to view the U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines for  Oral Management in Sjögren’s Patients: Caries Prevention

 

Topics: Dry Mouth, Sjogren's, Tooth Decay, Treatment, Clinical Practice Guidelines, Caries Prevention

Proud to be Your New Chairman!

Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2016

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I am honored to be the new Chair of the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation’s (SSF) National Board of Directors. Having served on the Board for the past five years, I have seen first-hand the incredible work being done by the SSF and the impact the Foundation has made on the lives of those living with Sjögren's.

As a practicing optometrist for thirty years, I have had the pleasure of holding leadership positions in numerous community and professional eye care organizations. With all this experience, I can confidently say that there is something truly different about the SSF. The CEO, Steven Taylor, has built an organization in which the volunteer board and the professional staff work together in an efficient and cooperative way. He has engaged hundreds of volunteers from across the country to help increase awareness, raise funds, lead events and promote the work of the SSF. He has established a Board that is made up of a combination of patients, family members of patients, doctors, along with others who have an interest in the disease. The SSF staff never treats their work as a job, but rather as a calling to make a difference in the lives of those struggling with this devastating disease.

The SSF works in many areas to ensure that no stone goes unturned and that every program and project is evaluated with the patient in mind! The SSF has a strong advocacy and research arm that is working with pharmaceutical companies to develop a therapeutic for Sjögren’s. Recently, the SSF held an introductory meeting with the FDA to help launch an ongoing dialogue about clinical trials for new therapeutics in Sjögren’s. In addition to this work, the SSF also has brought together professional leaders in all areas of care to produce and publish the first-ever Sjögren’s clinical practice guidelines that doctors can now use as a roadmap for how to appropriately care for Sjögren’s patients. And our strong focus on educating patients and their families can be seen by our annual national patient conference and our more than 65 patient support groups in the United States.

As Board Chair, I am honored to be representing all Sjögren’s patients. I am truly proud to be a part of this outstanding organization and hope you’ll join with me by supporting the SSF. TOGETHER, we can continue our momentum and improve the quality of life for all those who suffer with Sjögren’s!

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Click Here to  Become an SSF Member

Topics: Dry Eyes, Sjogren's, Advocacy, Research, Clinical Trials

Back to School, Back to Sjögren’s Basics

Posted on Mon, Sep 12, 2016

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This fall, as students around the country begin to head back to school and get ready for a new year, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is using this time to write about “back to basics” in terms of managing your Sjögren’s health. In this blog post, we have focused on the fundamentals that can often be forgotten in the busy day-to-day life.

Your medical team:

As most of you know, rheumatologists have the primary responsibility for managing Sjögren’s and usually are the lead of your “medical team.” That is why, when seeing a new physician or any of your many specialists, it is important to establish clear guidelines regarding your medical management, which means clarifying what things that doctor will be managing versus what your rheumatologists and/or primary care physician will oversee. All of these healthcare providers make up your “medical team.” However, it is crucial that your lead physician has all of the information regarding your diagnoses, treatment plans and prescriptions that your entire medical team is providing. This will help the lead physician better manage your case.

It is important to find a doctor who is both a good partner in treating your disease, as well as a good listener. While we know this can be very difficult, it is needed to make sure you are getting the attention your disease requires.

What medications to ask your doctor about:

A Sjögren’s patient’s treatment path should be decided on a case-by-case basis after the potential benefits and side-effects are weighed by patients and their healthcare providers. Currently, a number of different medications are available that might be used to manage symptoms. However, at the present time there is no single medication that has been conclusively proven to slow the progression of Sjögren’s or cure the disease.

Success in using disease-modifying agents to treat closely related disorders like systemic lupus and/or rheumatoid arthritis has led physicians to utilize some of these treatments in Sjögren’s as well. The two most popular choices at present include Plaquenil® (hydroxychloroquine)® (hydroxychloroquine) and intravenous rituximab. The decision to prescribe these specific medications is made on a case-by-case basis after careful consideration of potential risks and benefits.

In addition, many patients also are prescribed corticosteroids as well as prescription products to treat their various symptoms including but not limited to dry eyes, dry mouth, gastrointestinal and joint pain symptoms. As the SSF continues to release Sjögren’s Clinical Practice Guidline Sheets, be sure to ask you physician about the recommend treatment options listed. 

The SSF is dedicated to research into studies that help us better understand the full benefit of these treatments as well as working with companies to help develop new therapeutics that can treat the disease as a whole. The SSF is excited about the current pipeline for treatments that are being investigated by companies, and we continue to be at the forefront at working with and encouraging these companies to move forward.

What to take to a doctor’s appointment:

You should be prepared for a new doctor’s appointment and know your specific objectives for that visit. If this is your first visit to a doctor, it is essential to give them a copy of all your medical records. They will not have time to read it over there during your appointment, but they can keep it on file to review after your first visit.

It is also key to show your physician that you want to be an active participant in your care. Make sure to tell them about all of your daily care. Bringing with you a typed list of medications with dosage (including over-the-counter products and supplements) can be helpful.

In addition, keeping a symptoms journal or diet journal can be beneficial to recognize new or worsening symptoms along with foods that can trigger a are. Click here for the “Tracking Your Sjögren’s Symptoms” worksheet.

And finally, if you have questions for that healthcare provider, bring a list and hand it to them to review. This will help expedite their answers and make sure you get as many answers as possible in one appointment. The healthcare provider can sometimes quickly review a list of questions and tell you which ones are most important to be concerned about and which questions he/she can address at another appointment. Not only will you leave with more answers but your healthcare provider will appreciate your organization.

Find support:

As a Sjögren’s patient, you face the challenge every day of coping with this debilitating disease. Though there are an estimated four million Americans living with Sjögren’s, being diagnosed with an invisible illness can be isolating, which is why it is important to find support and credible information.

Signing up to receive The Moisture Seekers newsletter by becoming a member of the Foundation is your first step! Please share the articles in the newsletter that you find helpful with not only your physician, but family and friends to start a dialog about what you are going through.

Secondly, think about what works best for you in regards to how you can learn and gather information. Patients find different ways to learn how to live with Sjögren’s and here is a listing of just a few:

Click Here to Receive our Newsletter  by Becoming an SSF Member

Topics: Depression, Sjogren's, Treatment, coping with sjogren's, Immunosuppressant, Rituxan

Tips for Managing Gastrointestinal (GI) Symptoms

Posted on Mon, Aug 22, 2016

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an internal mucosal surface, rich in immune system cells/antibodies and nerves, whose main function is to digest food and absorb nutrients for optimal health. Enjoying food and sharing meals is an important part of every society, but for many with Sjögren’s, it is a major challenge.

90% of those with Sjögren’s and Scleroderma have GI complaints. Findings include focal infiltration of predominantly T-helper lymphocytes with or without glandular atrophy and nerve dysfunction.SSSF_Nutrition.dms For persistent GI problems in those with Sjögren’s, a Neurogastroenterology or GI Motility Center may be an option.

Here are some tips for managing GI symptoms in Sjögren’s: 

  • Eat smaller amounts more frequently. Chew as well as possible.
  • Swallowing problems may be related to esophagus muscle inflammation (myositis), dryness, or nerve dysfunction. Soft foods, olive oil, and coconut water might help.
  • GERD is more common and due to decreased Lower Esophageal Sphincter tone (60% vs 20% normal). Avoid reclining after a meal; various anti-acids are available. See tips for reflux in the SSF Patient Education Sheet, “Reflux and Your Throat,” found on the SSF website at www.sjogrens.org.
  • Gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying) occurs in Sjögren’s (30-70%), and, similar to Diabetes, causes upper abdominal pain/fullness/nausea. Gastric parietal cells can be destroyed leading to B12 deficiency. H pylori bacterial infection, if present, can be treated.
  • Small intestine immune attack (Celiac) or bacterial overgrowth can result in abdominal pain, cramping, bloating. Try a wheat/gluten free diet, or other food group elimination diets. Most nutrients are absorbed here. MALT (mucosal associated lymphoma) can occur.
  • The large intestine is where liquid is reabsorbed. Constipation and diarrhea can occur with Sjögren’s. Increase vegetables. Try magnesium supplement for constipation.
  • The pancreas, which releases digestive enzymes, can have low-level inflammation (20-40%) in Sjögren’s. Pancreatic enzyme trial is an option.
  • Liver – Autoimmune cholangitis (PBC, hallmark mitochondrial Ab) or Hepatitis (smooth muscle Ab) can occur in Sjögren’s. Hepatitis C virus should always be excluded.
The SSF thanks Nancy Carteron, MD, FACR, Clinical Faculty University California San Francisco, with special thanks to Mimi Lin, MD, Center for Neurogastroenterology & Motility, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California, for authoring these tips from the SSF Patient Education Sheet, GI Tips.

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Topics: Diet, Nutrition, Symptoms, Sjogren's, Treatment, Top 5 Tips, Gastroesophageal Reflux, Gastrointestinal (GI) tract

Living with Chronic Illness: Intimacy & Sjögren’s

Posted on Mon, Aug 01, 2016


handholding_SSF.jpgLiving with a chronic illness, like Sjögren’s, can have physical and emotional affects on a woman's sexuality. However, even with the presence of Sjögren’s, women and their partners can enjoy sexual activity and maintain a state of sexual well being. Be open with your partner about your needs and work together for satisfying intimacy.

Below are the three main reasons of how Sjögren’s can affect a woman's sexuality and tips to help.

Vaginal dryness. Women with Sjögren’s often experience severe vaginal dryness.

  • Vaginal moisturizers are available for daily use and lubricants can be used during intercourse.
  • Vaginal estrogen (hormones) may be right for some women.

Pain. Pelvic pain and pain during intercourse, can have many causes, including Sjögren’s, pudendal neuropathy, and interstitial cystitis. 

  • See your health care provider for an evaluation of why you have pelvic pain. There may not be an “easy” answer, but in many cases a possible cause can be identified and treated.
  • Treating vaginal dryness may improve some pelvic pain. 

Fatigue & mood symptoms. Fatigue, chronic pain and depression can contribute to the daily challenge of living with a chronic illness and affect sexual desire and function.

  • Tell your health care provider if you are feeling depressed. Treating depression may help to improve problems with sexual function.
  • Take care of your Sjögren’s and make time for yourself and things you enjoy. 

This information is from the SSF Patient Education Sheet: Sex and Sjögren’s by Anne E. Burke, MD, MPH

 Thank you to our Conquering Sjögren’s blog sponsor SYLK®.

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Click here to learn more about SYLK®, an FDA-cleared moisturizing lubricant.  

Topics: Depression, Sjogren's, Fatigue, coping with sjogren's, Vaginal Dryness, Pelvic pain, Interstitial cystitis

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management in Sjögren’s

Posted on Wed, Jul 20, 2016

July is Dry Eye Awareness Month! During July, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation works to help educate the public about dry eye symptoms, treatment options, and the possible cause being Sjögren’s. We hope you enjoy our July blogs aimed to promote dry eye education and encourage you to share this post.

The Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) has developed the first-ever U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management in Sjögren’s to ensure quality and consistency of care for the assessment and management of patients.

The SSF Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management in Sjögren’s established that, in a given patient, the clinician must determine whether the dry eye is due to inadequate production of tears, excess evaporation, or a combination of both mechanisms. The success of a treatment option depends upon proper recognition and approach to therapy.

Click here to view the SSF Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management in Sjögren’s and its recommendations.

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The SSF Sjögren’s Clinical Practice Guidelines initiative is funded fully by the SSF with no corporate or pharmaceutical industry support. The SSF would like to thank our committee chairmen and members of the ocular working group for volunteering their time and expertise to develop these guidelines. We would also like to thank all SSF members and our generous supporters for helping to make the dream of Sjögren’s Clinical Practice Guidelines start to become a reality! 

Click here to view the U.S. Clinical Practice Guidelines  for Ocular Management in Sjögren’s    

Topics: Sicca, Dry Eyes, Sjogren's, Treatment, coping with sjogren's, Punctal Plugs, Clinical Practice Guidelines for Ocular Management, Clinical Practice Guidelines

Dry Eye Awareness Month: Serum Tears & Sjögren’s

Posted on Fri, Jul 01, 2016

July is Dry Eye Awareness Month! The Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation partners with various organizations during July to help educate the public about dry eye symptoms, treatment options, and the possible cause being Sjögren’s. We hope you enjoy our July blogs aimed to promote dry eye awareness and education.   

Q) I have heard a lot about some Sjögren’s patients finding relief from Serum Tears. What are they, how are they made and will it help me with my dry eye?

SSF_Dry_Eye.jpgA) Topical autologous serum used to treat ocular surface damage from dry eye disease is usually reserved for the most severe cases that have not responded to other treatments, particularly intensive lubricant and anti-inflammatory therapy. Autologous describes the fact that it is taken from the patient themselves; serum describes the component of the blood that is used to prepare the drop. It was first reported to improve dry eye symptoms and signs in 1984, but there are now a number of reports supporting its beneficial effect in Sjögren’s disease. Most often prepared as a 20% topical solution, autologous serum must be prepared by removing blood from the patient’s vein and spinning down the clotted cells to isolate the liquid serum which is then diluted in artificial tears solution into small vials. It is not specifically approved by the FDA. Autologous serum contains fibronectin, vitamin A, cytokines, and growth factors, as well as anti-inflammatory substances, such as interleukin receptor antagonists and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases. It is not clear which of these components is most helpful, but significant improvement in symptoms, tear break up time, and surface staining have been reported.

The disadvantages of the use of autologous serum include the issue that it must be prepared by the eye care practitioner under well controlled conditions or by a compounding pharmacy, as well as the need to refrigerate the drops. There is a potential risk of infection if contamination of the solution occurs. The stability of frozen autologous serum has been verified for up to 3 months.

Typically, the serum is applied topically four times daily, and this can be done in conjunction with other therapy including topical lubricants, topical cyclosporine, or oral tear stimulants. The serum does not work well with contact lens wear.

This option may not work for every Sjögren’s patient and thus one will need to find an ophthalmologist or optometrist that is familiar with Serum Tears to accurately gauge the benefits.

-Gary Foulks, MD, FACS

This information was first printed in The Moisture Seeker, SSF's patient 
newsletter for members.

Click Here to Receive our Newsletter  by Becoming an SSF Member

Topics: Dry Eyes, Sjogren's, Treatment, coping with sjogren's, Ask the Expert, Serum Tears

Meet the Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation!

Posted on Tue, Jun 21, 2016

SSF_2015.jpgWho is the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation?

The Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is proud to be the only national non-profit organization focused on increasing research, education and awareness for Sjögren's. Founded in 1983 by Elaine Harris, a frustrated patient, the SSF’s mission was simple: help patients cope with their Sjögren's, increase awareness, and support research efforts. 

Today, under the leadership of Steven Taylor, SSF CEO, our mission has remained the same while we have grown into a multi-faceted organization that has expanded its outreach, increased its funding for research, education, and awareness of this debilitating disease. In addition, the Foundation is an internationally recognized organization shaping the industry in terms of research, education, patient care, advocacy and new therapies. 

As the SSF continues to expand, our commitment to patients will never change; they are the reason we were founded and the reason we continue to operate today. 

Elaine_Harris.png Elaine Harris, SSF Founder, at the 2016 New York City Sip for Sjögren’s Event

What is Sjögren’s?

Sjögren’s (“SHOW-grins”) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects the entire body. Along with symptoms of extensive dryness, other serious complications include profound fatigue, chronic pain, major organ involvement, neuropathies and lymphomas.

Today, an estimated 4 million Americans suffering from Sjögren’s, both men and women of different ages and ethnicities.

Men_with_SS.jpg   This_is_Sjogrens.-1.jpg

Click here to learn more about the  Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation

Topics: Sjogren's, Advocacy, Men with Sjogren's,

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