Conquering Sjogren’s: Follow us on our journey to change the face of Sjogren’s

RESEARCH UPDATE: New Breakthrough from SSF Grantees

Posted on Thu, Sep 07, 2017

 "Findings yield new clues to puzzling autoimmune disease"

OMRF.jpgOklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) scientist and former SSF research grant recipient, Kathy Sivils, Ph.D., and her colleagues have identified a strong association between a variant in a gene called OAS1 and susceptibility to Sjögren’s. This variant may provide valuable insight into the genetic basis of Sjögren’s, as well as other autoimmune conditions with similar triggers.

This research was completed by the Sjögren’s Genetics Network (SGENE) that consists of an international coalition of researchers led by scientists at OMRF, including two former SSF Research Grantees: Dr. Kathy Sivils and Dr. Christopher Lessard.

“There was very little evidence for a connection to autoimmune disease prior to our study. Firmly establishing this new association with Sjögren’s then led us to look at the gene’s function in more detail,” said OMRF scientist, co-leader of the project and former SSF research grant recipient, Christopher Lessard, Ph.D.

“If we can get out ahead of the disease, it might help lessen the severe damage that can occur in salivary glands and other organs,” Dr. Sivils said. “Early diagnosis and proper treatment are crucial, and discoveries like this one may give researchers and healthcare professionals more to work with as they look for clues to this perplexing disease.”

Although this is only one step in unlocking the mystery of Sjögren’s, this breakthrough gives hope for future researchers to investigate causes, progressions, and treatments at the disease’s genetic level.

“On behalf of Sjögren’s patients, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) applauds OMRF for its commitment to finding the many unanswered questions about the disease,” said SSF CEO Steven Taylor. “Drs. Sivils and Lessard, along with their OMRF colleagues, continue to leave their mark in advancing Sjögren’s research, and patients worldwide will benefit from their hard work.”

It’s because of your generous support that the SSF is able to award grants to talented investigators, like Dr. Sivils and Dr. Lessard, who bring novel approaches to Sjögren’s research. The SSF is currently focused on many research initiatives including: Research Grants, Clinical Practice GuidelinesClinical Trials Consortium and our 5-Year Breakthrough GoalWe hope you will consider donating to the SSF Research Program and help us transform the future of Sjögren’s for all patients and their families. 

Click here to read the full press release from OMRF

Donate to Research

Topics: Sjogren's, Advocacy, Research

World Sjögren's Day 2017

Posted on Sat, Jul 01, 2017

World Sjögren's Day commemorates the birthday of Henrik Sjögren, the Swedish ophthalmologist who first identified the disease in 1933 and has helped all patients find answers to their health questions. This year, the SSF will join with other organizations around the world to celebrate recent advancements made in Sjögren's this past year and raise awareness of the disease in honor of Dr. Sjögren.

World Sjögren's Day helps put a face on the millions of people who live with this disease or suffer from symptoms and have yet to be diagnosed. It gives everyone touched by Sjögren's a vehicle to reach out and educate those close to them - family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, etc. - about the disease. 

We encourage you to use this opportunity to let your voice heard and talk about Sjögren’s with the people in your life. By sharing your story and educating others, you are helping to form the message that Sjögren's is a serious disease that deserves to be recognized. You may also be helping someone who is looking for answers to their problems.

How Can You Get Involved:

This is Sjo Collage 2.jpg

What is Sjögren’s?

Sjögren’s (“SHOW-grins”) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects the entire body. Along with symptoms of extensive dryness, other serious complications include profound fatigue, chronic pain, major organ involvement, neuropathies and lymphomas.

Today, as many as four million Americans are living with this disease and nine out of ten patients are women with an average age of onset in the late 40’s. However, Sjögren’s can occur in all age groups, even in children.

Make a Donation Now


UPDATE:

World Sjögren’s Day Raises over $8,000!

Thank you to everyone who shared their story and donated in honor of World Sjögren’s Day, which was created to commemorate the birthday of Dr. Henrik Sjögren! Together, we not only increased awareness of this debilitating disease but also raised over $8,000 for Sjögren’s research and SSF patient programs!

Remember, even though the day has passed you can still donate in honor of Dr. Sjögren and all patients.  Click here to learn more.

Topics: World Sjogren's Day, Advocacy, #ThisIsSjögrens

What You Need to Know About Sjögren’s Clinical Trials

Posted on Tue, Jun 13, 2017

clinical trial.jpgClinical trials are a crucial element in medicine and health care to help develop drugs that will treat or possibly cure certain diseases. Researchers use clinical trials to test if a drug works, how well it works, how safe it is and how it compares to any currently available treatments.

Before a drug can be tested on human patients, it is tested for years in labs. Clinical trials are among the final steps of the drug development process. When drugs are brought to clinical trials, pharmaceutical companies must find enough patients to participate in the research in order to get solid results. The rarer the condition, the more difficult it can be to find the number of patients needed for a trial.

Considerations for Participating in a Clinical Trial

If you have been diagnosed with Sjögren’s and are thinking about participating in a clinical trial, there are several factors you should consider. You can learn about trials taking place in your area on the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation’s website by clicking here. When researching details of potential trials that might work for you, find out the risks and benefits of each trial, ask if there are any costs that you may be responsible for associated with participation, and most importantly, talk to your doctor about whether or not the trial is right for you.

One specific consideration for participating in a Sjögren’s study is your diagnosis. In some cases, the diagnostic criteria in the study protocol may be different than the criteria your doctor used in your diagnosis.

Clinical trials can help patients gain access to new drugs and expert medical care, while contributing to important medical research benefiting the larger community. However, patients should not enter a clinical trial without considering the risks and costs to themselves as well – the medication might not work, or might have unpleasant side effects; the time and travel to the study site, time for study visits and absences from work might be costly; and once the trial is complete, the treatment may still need to undergo months of approvals before you can have regular access to it. Additionally, as a patient in a clinical trial, you may receive a placebo drug or therapy instead of the new treatment being studied. Even if you are a patient receiving a placebo, you will still receive basic standard of care and medical oversight for your condition.

How do Clinical Trials Work?

Clinical trials vary greatly depending on the type of study and the treatment being tested. Each trial is usually funded, or sponsored, by a pharmaceutical company, academic research center, or federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Studies take place across the U.S. and even globally, at hospitals, physician offices, clinics and more – one study might have researchers conducting the trial in many different locations.

Prior to enrolling, you should know how long the study is expected to last, where you will need to go and what you will need to do in order to participate, how your participation will be compensated for – or if you will be compensated for your participation and more. These questions can be answered during discussions with the doctor or staff running the study. If you are still interested in participating, the study staff will usually schedule a screening visit. The details of screening appointments varies from study to study, but all screening appointments are used to determine your eligibility for the trial. Depending on the therapy being studied, screening appointments might look to learn your medical history; run blood, urine or tissue samples; and learn what medications you are currently taking.

Following the screening, the team running the study will contact you to let you know if you qualify for the trial or not. If you do qualify, you will be scheduled for your first study visit, which will help establish the baseline of your participation in the study. Again, the specifics will vary in each trial, but the doctor might run tests or draw labs, as well as give you the drug being studied and instructions for dosing and any reporting you may need to do. This first visit will also give you a chance to schedule future visits.

Throughout the duration of the study, you will need to attend appointments at various intervals. Some studies require regular visits or even hospital stays, while others can be done less frequently. As a study progresses, you may need to be seen less frequently. At each visit, the doctor may re-run tests or labs to compare against the baseline. You also may be given more medication at each visit.

When the study comes to an end, you will need to turn in any unused medication and reporting documents. The doctor will perform tests, labs or procedures similar to what was done during your screening or baseline appointments to see if the drug has made an impact on your health. The doctor may be able to tell you what treatment you received during the study once the study is complete. Once the clinical trial is completed, you will need to revert to your previous physician, if different, and treatment schedule.

Deciding to join a clinical trial can be a difficult decision, but taking part can help researchers learn more about potential treatments for your condition. If you carefully consider the risks and rewards, and arm yourself with information before committing to a study, participating can be a very rewarding experience.

by Kristen Snipes, Project Director at Rho, a Clinical Research Organization

This information was first printed in The Moisture Seeker, SSF's patient  
newsletter for members. 

Click here to learn more about  Sjögren’s clinical trials

Topics: Treatment, Advocacy, Clinical Trials

April is Sjögren’s Awareness Month!

Posted on Sat, Apr 01, 2017

SSF This Is Sjogren's.pngApril is Sjögren’s Awareness Month! To portray the entire patient experience, in our This Is Sjögren’s Awareness Campaign, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is drawing facts and figures from our recent “Living with Sjögren’s survey findings. This survey, which was conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of the SSF, gave the Foundation amazing data about how patients’ lives are affected by Sjögren’s, what symptoms and complications patients live with and how the disease affects their emotional and financial well-being. 

The independent nationwide survey, designed by Harris Poll along with the SSF and a volunteer committee of patients and healthcare providers, was mailed to Foundation members in the spring of 2016. Nearly 3,000 adults shared their experiences with the disease and its physical, financial and emotional effects on their lives.

With the support of our members, this survey was developed to help the SSF:

  • Educate regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies about a need for a therapeutic drug for Sjögren’s
  • Support the need for additional SSF Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for how to treat and manage Sjögren’s
  • Provide researchers with information about the variety and severity of experiences patients have with Sjögren’s
  • Create greater awareness of this disease among consumers and healthcare professionals

Every day the SSF is sharing a fact from these survey findings or other information about the disease on our social media accounts to show: This is Sjögren’s (#ThisIsSjögrens)! While the daily post give a small glimpse into Sjögren’s, by the end of April, we hope these 30 posts will show the complexity and seriousness of the disease. SSF_17114.03-4-2.png

How Can You Get Involved:

We encourage you to use April Awareness month and our #ThisIsSjögrens social media campaign, as a way to talk about Sjögren’s with your family and friends. Every post is an opportunity to start a conversation about living with Sjögren’s and how it affects you. The more others understand, the more support you can find. And know that we at the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation are here for you! We are committed to accelerating the development of better diagnostic, management and therapeutics that will have the greatest potential impact on improving the quality of life for Sjögren’s patients. Together, we will transform the future of Sjögren’s!

SSF This Is Sjogren's April 2017.jpg

Click here to view our daily  April Awareness campaign on Facebook!

 

Topics: coping with sjogren's, Advocacy, Men with Sjogren's,, Children with Sjogren's,, April Awareness Month, #ThisIsSjögrens

Sjögren's Awareness Month is Almost Here!

Posted on Mon, Mar 20, 2017


ATT00002.pngApril is Sjögren's Awareness Month and we hope you will join us in educating the public about this complex disease and how it affects those who are living with it.

Sjögren's is often described as an invisible illness because many of the disease’s debilitating symptoms cannot be physically seen. This can lead to a misunderstanding about the seriousness of the disease and be extremely isolating for those living with Sjögren's. 

This April, the SSF is going to build upon our This Is Sjögren’s campaign from last year! Our goal is to help others visualize the disease from a patient’s perspective, and close the gap between the reality of Sjögren’s and the perception that many non-patients have with Sjögren’s! 

To better portray the entire patient experience, in our #ThisIsSjögrens 2017 April Awareness campaign, the SSF will be drawing facts and figures from our recent national patient survey. This survey, which was conducted last year, has given the SSF amazing data about how our patients lives are affected by Sjögren’s, what symptoms and complications patients live with and how the disease affects their emotional and financial well-being!  

Each day, throughout April, the Foundation will post a different #ThisIsSjögrens factoid or patient phrase on social media – so stay tuned! And while the daily post will give a small glimpse into living with Sjögren’s, by the end of April, we hope these 30 posts will show the complexity and seriousness of the disease.

Let Your Voice Be Heard!

SSF This Is Sjogren's.png

As the voice of the SSF, we want to hear form you! Please comment below and share with us one phrase that represents what it’s like to live with Sjögren’s. Thank you for your support; together we will transform the future of Sjögren’s.                                             

Example: Sjögren’s means choosing a medication that will help with my fatigue and joint pain but knowing it will make my eyes drier and more painful. #ThisIsSjögrens!

Topics: coping with sjogren's, Advocacy, April Awareness Month

How to Talk With Your Family about Sjögren’s

Posted on Thu, Dec 15, 2016

There is a growing body of evidence that rich social support networks are important to overall health, immune function and healing. They improve quality of life and facilitate coping with chronic illness. Conversely, negative social interactions create a stress response that have the opposite effect. Support from family members and close friends can be one of the most important resources for you to draw on when dealing with Sjögren’s. Skillful communication about your illness is key to nourishing the relationships that matter the most to you. This article only attempts to skim the surface of this complex topic. 155698-350x233-talking-with-doctor.jpg

Three characteristics of Sjögren’s create particular communication challenges.

1. Untimely: Sjögren’s is typically diagnosed in the prime of life (40s and 50s), when family responsibilities and careers are in full swing.

While some are lucky enough to have mild symptoms, the majority of patients experience flu-like fatigue, pain and brain fog that demand a new, strict energy budget. Jobs may be lost or hours cut. Frequent medical and dental visits and costly products such as artificial tears strain both schedules and finances. Family dynamics are rearranged by the illness, causing stress, especially if there is little support or strong disagreement about how to meet the new challenge. Single people who become ill may feel particularly vulnerable and alone, wondering how will they ever manage.

2. Uncertain: Early on, many patients have a hard time accepting that this disease will be a lifelong challenge. The sense of loss and fear of long term illness can be profound for both patients and loved ones.

Symptoms may wax and wane for no obvious reason, although they rarely disappear. This can add to confusion and denial. The initial focus of patients and family members is often “how can we x this?” Denial can make adjustment to a new normal even more protracted. Sometimes denial persists for years, until it becomes clear that medications and other interventions cannot bring back “life as usual.”

3. Invisible: Sjögren’s patients tend to look well most of the time, even when feeling quite ill.

The outward appearance of normalcy can make it hard for others to appreciate the severity of your illness. This is made worse when doctors don’t address symptoms such as fatigue and pain that make it a struggle to get through the day. Even though Sjögren’s is quite common, most doctors are not trained to recognize even typical systemic symptoms, and tend to focus on dryness. Some medical websites reinforce this incorrect notion that Sjögren’s is mostly about dryness, rather than a serious systemic disease. When presented with this inaccurate portrayal of the disease, family members and patients become understandably confused. Healthcare providers frequently minimize life-changing symptoms or even become dismissive, leaving the patient feeling powerless or invisible. When family members also fail to understand the devastating impact that Sjögren’s can have, the emotional turmoil can be overwhelming.

As a result of widespread misinformation, patients find themselves needing to become “experts” in their disease. Backed with up-to-date knowledge, it is possible to advocate for care and educate health care providers when needed. An excellent, reliable source of information can be found at the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) website, www.sjogrens.org. Be sure to read or reread the “About Sjögren’s” section, especially the FAQ. Encourage family members to read it too. It’s really good. It might seem overwhelming and a bit disheartening that you need to learn so much about Sjögren’s, especially early after diagnosis. However, educating yourself will provide essential tools for communication with family, friends and doctors.

Communication with family members

Spouses/partners and other family members suffer grief and loss too. It is important to acknowledge this. Open the discussion early. Ask about their fears regarding the impact of your illness and the uncertainly it creates. Be prepared to revisit this conversation several times. Both you and your significant others will go through loss and grief, although the timing and process is different for each individual.

In spite of your best efforts toward clear, empathic communication with your family, some people may respond with judgment and blame. This often comes as a painful surprise, especially at a time when support feels most needed. Relationship upheaval is typical for people with serious illness. It is important not to blame yourself for the illness, but to develop good self-care with an attitude of deep kindness toward yourself. Attempt to keep lines of positive communication open, but set boundaries to protect yourself from negativity.

While unsupportive family members may eventually shift their stance, the approach of trying to educate them repeatedly after several unsuccessful attempts will only result in unnecessary pain. Just having one or two people in your life who truly “get it” can be enough. Recognize that some people may be good at practical support, but unavailable emotionally. The reverse may also occur.

Practical support tips

Practical support, especially from family members, can go a long way in helping you manage your health. Most Sjögren’s patients can participate in a number of activities, especially when family members take over tasks that are particularly challenging for you to do. It takes some trial and error to learn what you can do without compromising your health. Being a good observer of your unique patterns will help you plan the types of activities and pacing that works for you. Even with careful planning, the unpredictable nature of Sjögren’s will sometimes knock you down when you don’t expect it. It is always good to have a backup plan ready- and soup in your freezer!

Many people are happy to help, but might not ask or could assume you are doing ne if you have a partner or other adults in the home. It can be difficult to ask for help, especially if you are the “can do” type of person. It is good to remember that providing support can be beneficial to both givers and recipients. Sometimes support arrives from people you don’t expect to come through, while those you think of as close friends or family may not provide support.

Examples of useful responses and communication tools

  ♦ If you are unsure of a person’s awareness or interest, you can ask: “I’m not sure how much you know about Sjögren’s- do you want to know more about what’s really going on with me?

  ♦ When someone asks if they can help, try to be ready with a specific request such as stopping by with dinner, running errands, childcare, etc. If you are caught off guard, a good response might be: “Can I get back to you? I could really use help but I am feeling too overwhelmed to think about it right now.”

  ♦ State your limitations and needs, clearly and without apology. If you are too tired to cook, shop or clean, state that and request specific help from household members. For example: “I’m not well enough to do housework right now. Could you please vacuum and clean the bathrooms once a week?” as opposed to the more vague, “I need more help with the cleaning.”

  ♦ Many people go into advice giving mode, offering instant remedies such as the latest diet, various medical regimens, healers etc. This may be motivated by a true desire to help, or it can be a way to distance themselves from your experience. Some possible responses: “Thanks for your concern, I am working closely with my doctor on this,” or “I appreciate your concern. I need to do this in my own way and in my own time. It would be great if you could support my choices.”

  ♦ Dealing with insensitive and judgmental comments, especially if repeated, is difficult. One strategy is to provide the speaker with an opportunity to consider the hurtfulness of their comments, by asking: “Let me understand. Are you saying (repeat hurtful comment)?” The person may back pedal or give their comment more thought. This does not always work. Here are examples of responses to real life comments:

  ♦ “If you just stopped taking all those medications, you would be fine.”

  ♦ Response: “What I’m hearing you say is you think Sjögren’s is not serious enough to require medication.”

  ♦ “If you would exercise/lose weight/eat paleo etc. you would be fine.”

  ♦ Response: “Do you think if I (fill in the blank) my Sjögren’s will go away?”

  ♦ To a more subtle comment insinuating you are not trying hard enough: “I’m hearing you say that if I tried harder that I could do _______ (fill in activity) and still manage my Sjögren’s symptoms.”

  ♦ If responses like this do not work, set boundaries: “It hurts to hear you say this. I am doing my best. Please keep these comments to yourself.”

It can be especially difficult when someone close to you clearly does not understand your illness or support your efforts to take care of yourself. Relationships that were difficult to begin with may become even more painful. Some relationships do not survive the stress of chronic illness. Family members have a limited capacity for emotional or practical support. If you don’t feel supported by those closest to you, being creative about organizing your life, getting support from others, and setting excellent boundaries may be your best strategy. If you are dealing with a close relationship that seems to be faltering, it can be helpful to seek professional support from someone knowledgeable about chronic disease.

Most importantly, know that the news here is not all bad. Many people do step up to the plate, although they may need prompting. Be patient if they are trying to understand; it takes time to adjust and to learn about Sjögren’s. 

by Sarah Schafer, MD and Sjögren’s Patient
Special acknowledgment to Teri Rumpf, PhD and Julia Oleinik, RN for their contributions to this article

This information was first printed in The Moisture Seeker, SSF's member newsletter

Take Control of Your Health!  Receive our Newsletter by Becoming an SSF Member

Topics: Depression, Sjogren's, Treatment, coping with sjogren's, Advocacy

Proud to be Your New Chairman!

Posted on Mon, Sep 26, 2016

Cohen20portrait20201420-120-20Copy.jpg

I am honored to be the new Chair of the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation’s (SSF) National Board of Directors. Having served on the Board for the past five years, I have seen first-hand the incredible work being done by the SSF and the impact the Foundation has made on the lives of those living with Sjögren's.

As a practicing optometrist for thirty years, I have had the pleasure of holding leadership positions in numerous community and professional eye care organizations. With all this experience, I can confidently say that there is something truly different about the SSF. The CEO, Steven Taylor, has built an organization in which the volunteer board and the professional staff work together in an efficient and cooperative way. He has engaged hundreds of volunteers from across the country to help increase awareness, raise funds, lead events and promote the work of the SSF. He has established a Board that is made up of a combination of patients, family members of patients, doctors, along with others who have an interest in the disease. The SSF staff never treats their work as a job, but rather as a calling to make a difference in the lives of those struggling with this devastating disease.

The SSF works in many areas to ensure that no stone goes unturned and that every program and project is evaluated with the patient in mind! The SSF has a strong advocacy and research arm that is working with pharmaceutical companies to develop a therapeutic for Sjögren’s. Recently, the SSF held an introductory meeting with the FDA to help launch an ongoing dialogue about clinical trials for new therapeutics in Sjögren’s. In addition to this work, the SSF also has brought together professional leaders in all areas of care to produce and publish the first-ever Sjögren’s clinical practice guidelines that doctors can now use as a roadmap for how to appropriately care for Sjögren’s patients. And our strong focus on educating patients and their families can be seen by our annual national patient conference and our more than 65 patient support groups in the United States.

As Board Chair, I am honored to be representing all Sjögren’s patients. I am truly proud to be a part of this outstanding organization and hope you’ll join with me by supporting the SSF. TOGETHER, we can continue our momentum and improve the quality of life for all those who suffer with Sjögren’s!

SSF_Board.png


Click Here to  Become an SSF Member

Topics: Dry Eyes, Sjogren's, Advocacy, Research, Clinical Trials

Meet the Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation!

Posted on Tue, Jun 21, 2016

SSF_2015.jpgWho is the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation?

The Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is proud to be the only national non-profit organization focused on increasing research, education and awareness for Sjögren's. Founded in 1983 by Elaine Harris, a frustrated patient, the SSF’s mission was simple: help patients cope with their Sjögren's, increase awareness, and support research efforts. 

Today, under the leadership of Steven Taylor, SSF CEO, our mission has remained the same while we have grown into a multi-faceted organization that has expanded its outreach, increased its funding for research, education, and awareness of this debilitating disease. In addition, the Foundation is an internationally recognized organization shaping the industry in terms of research, education, patient care, advocacy and new therapies. 

As the SSF continues to expand, our commitment to patients will never change; they are the reason we were founded and the reason we continue to operate today. 

Elaine_Harris.png Elaine Harris, SSF Founder, at the 2016 New York City Sip for Sjögren’s Event

What is Sjögren’s?

Sjögren’s (“SHOW-grins”) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects the entire body. Along with symptoms of extensive dryness, other serious complications include profound fatigue, chronic pain, major organ involvement, neuropathies and lymphomas.

Today, an estimated 4 million Americans suffering from Sjögren’s, both men and women of different ages and ethnicities.

Men_with_SS.jpg   This_is_Sjogrens.-1.jpg

Click here to learn more about the  Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation

Topics: Sjogren's, Advocacy, Men with Sjogren's,

This is Sjögren’s!

Posted on Fri, Apr 01, 2016

AprilisSjogrensAwarenessMonthToday begins Sjögren’s Awareness Month and for the next 30 days we will use your words to help raise awareness of this debilitating and complex disease.

You are the voice of the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation, which is why last month we asked you to share with us one phrase that represents what it is like to live with Sjögren’s. Everyday in April we will post a different one of your phrases on social media that reflects living with this invisible disease.

Each phrase will give a small glimpse into the life of Sjögren’s patients and by the end of April, we hope these 30 phrases will help others better visualize and understand the disease. 

We encourage you to follow us this April and look for opportunities to share how Sjögren’s has impacted your life. Remember that by talking with one person at a time, one community at a time, one physician at a time and one company at a time – together we will reach our goal and conquer Sjögren’s!  

This is Sjögren’s!

#Day1: I look healthy on the outside, however my disease is attacking my internal organs and destroying me from the inside out. #ThisIsSjögrens #SjögrensAwarenessMonth #TheSjögrensJourney

This_is_Sjogrens.-1

Click here to view our daily  April Awareness campaign on Facebook!

What is Sjögren’s?

Sjögren’s (“SHOW-grins”) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects the entire body. Along with symptoms of extensive dryness, other serious complications include profound fatigue, chronic pain, major organ involvement, neuropathies and lymphomas.

Today, as many as four million Americans are living with this disease and nine out of ten patients are women with an average age of onset in the late 40’s. However, Sjögren’s can occur in all age groups, even in children.

 

Topics: Symptoms, Sjogren's, Advocacy, April Awareness Month

The TIME is NOW – SSF Plans for 2016

Posted on Mon, Jan 11, 2016


ssf_logo

Happy New Year! 

As many of you know, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) has been methodically working towards making the lives of Sjögren’s patients better! Thanks to the dedication of our Board of Directors, our staff and hundreds of volunteers, the SSF has been actively working on our overall strategic plan to make Sjögren’s a household name, increase treatment options for Sjögren’s while also helping to educate healthcare professionals on how to treat and manage Sjögren’s.   

Last year was a banner year for the SSF but 2016 is already proving to be even more exciting! There is still a lot of work to be done, but we know with the help of you, our volunteers and our staff, we are going to see great strides in many areas for Sjögren’s.

The time is now and here are just some of our plans for 2016:

  • Continue to expand the SSF’s Clinical Trials Consortium (CTC) and encourage the development of therapies for Sjögren’s. The SSF’s CTC works alongside companies that have compounds/ molecules currently under review for clinical trials in Sjögren’s. We help these companies better understand the disease, our patient community and encourage them to develop a treatment. In 2016, we plan to see more than 10 clinical trials started for a Sjögren’s therapeutic that will treat the entire disease, not just one symptom! This work of our CTC has been years in the making and we are most excited about how a therapeutic will be a game changer for Sjögren’s!
  • Expand our focus of educating all healthcare providers about the severity of Sjögren’s and its numerous manifestations by attending professional conferences, speaking to healthcare organizations and utilizing the SSF’s Awareness Ambassadors to expand our reach into physicians’ offices by educating them about the SSF and our resources.
  • Work alongside the FDA to help them understand the need for Sjögren’s therapeutic and educate them about the severity of Sjögren’s.
  • Fund new and innovative research that will lead to new biomarkers, diagnostic tools and learning what causes Sjögren’s through the SSF Research Grant Program. The SSF also will work with young investigators to encourage and recognize their work, in hopes that they pursue a career in Sjögren’s.
  • Continue the peer review process for our Clinical Practice Guidelines on the systemic manifestations of Sjögren’s. Our committee of rheumatologists will continue to focus on writing recommendations for how to treat and manage the 16 systemic manifestations that we identified need guidelines. These include fatigue, joint pain, lymphoma, internal organ involvement, etc.
  • Conduct a comprehensive national patient survey to gather crucial information about the numerous complications patients experience as well as the burden of the illness and their quality of life. The SSF is partnering with Harris Polling, a division of Nielson, to develop this survey with plans of distribution in late February. The findings of our survey will help the SSF, as we represent the patient voice and advocate for all Sjögren’s suffers.
  • Further our support of patients, family and caregivers through our website, patient materials, monthly patient newsletter as well as new resources we are developing for 2016.

 And in the few short days of 2016, the SSF has already seen two major accomplishments:

So as you can see, the time is now and the SSF has big plans for 2016! The progress the SSF continues to make and the recent advancements in Sjögren's research and awareness speaks to the combined efforts of hundreds of volunteers. It is because of their willingness to share their story, attend our events, volunteer their time, donate to the SSF, we are helping to create a future of hope for all patients and their families. s_taylor_headshot-1copy-1

It will take an army to achieve our plans for 2016, so I hope you will consider stepping up and getting involved! The Time Is Now!   

Sincerely,

Steve_Sig
Steven Taylor,
SSF Chief Executive Officer

Click Here to Learn More Ways to Connect with the SSF!

Topics: Treatment, Advocacy, Research, 50in5: Breakthrough Goal, Clinical Trials

Subscribe via E-mail

For reprint permission requests, please contact us at [email protected].

Donate

Help support the SSF's 5-Year Breakthrough Goal initiatives by donating.

Donate to Research

Follow Me

Posts by category

Some additional information in one line