Conquering Sjogren’s: Follow us on our journey to change the face of Sjogren’s

Conquering the Complexities of Sjögren's

Posted on Fri, Apr 12, 2019

April is Sjögren’s Awareness Month and with an estimated four million Americans suffering from Sjögren’s, both men and women of different ages and ethnicities, it is one of the most prevalent but still lesser known autoimmune diseases. Sjögren’s is also not a “cookie cutter” disease and affects patients differently. This can lead to a misunderstanding about the seriousness of the disease and be extremely isolating for those living with it.

Using our new 2019 theme, Conquering the Complexities of Sjögren's, we are going to expand our #ThisIsSjögrens campaign to help others visualize the vast impact of the disease by posting a new patient story every day in April. While the daily posts will each give one small glimpse into living with Sjögren’s, by the end of April, we hope these 30 posts will shine a light on Sjögren’s and ensure a greater understanding of this complex disease.

We encourage you to use Sjögren’s Awareness Month as a way to talk about the disease. Every day is an opportunity to start a conversation about living with Sjögren’s and how it affects you. The more others understand, the more support you can find. Click here to learn more.


Day 1

Candi B., 46 (diagnosed at 43), Disabled (Former payroll manger)

My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms is living with 49% lung function. I wish people knew how dangerous it is to call this only a “dry eye and dry mouth disease.” 

Click here to learn more about our April Awareness theme, Conquering the Complexities of Sjögren's.

Day 2

Jen Day 2

 

Jen B., 46 (diagnosed at 45 after 3 years of being misdiagnosed)

My most debilitating Sjögren's symptoms are pain, fatigue & itchiness. I wish people knew that just because I’m smiling & getting things done, it doesn’t mean I’m not in excruciating pain.

As a patient, remember to put yourself first. Refusing to run yourself into the ground isn’t selfish. Sjögren's Warriors have compromised immune systems, which is invisible.

Click here to learn more about our April Awareness theme, Conquering the Complexities of Sjögren's.

Day 3

Day 3 Randy

Randy K., 49 (diagnosed during mid-thirties)

I wish people understood that this complex disease affects both men & women of all ages. As a Sjögren’s patient, remember to stay informed and keep asking questions. Never assume that things can’t change.

Click here to learn more about the SSF & symptoms of Sjögren's.

Day 4

Day 4

Jaeden, 9 (diagnosed at 6)

My most difficult symptoms are body aches, dry mouth & muscle pain. The hardest part of living with Sjögren's is that people don’t understand when I need to take breaks.

Click here to learn more about pediatric Sjögren's.

Day 5

Day 5

Erin B., 34 (diagnosed at 24)

Sjögren’s means that outwardly I look normal but some days I’m so exhausted I can’t get out of bed, which isn’t an option as a mom. It’s hard when people don’t understand it’s not a “tired” you can fight through by having some coffee or taking a nap.

Click here to learn more about fatigue and Sjögren's. 

Day 6

Pricilla Day 3 

Priscilla A., 43 (diagnosed at age 41)

Sjögren’s means that my disease cannot be treated by just taking a pill.

Click here to learn more about treatment options and coping methods with Sjögren's

Day 7

Day 7 Allison

Allison, 24 (diagnosed at 23)

My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms are brain fog, fatigue and constant aches & pains. I wish people knew that living with this disease means my smile hides more than you know.

Click here to learn more about brain fog and Sjögren's.

Day 8

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Leah G., 38 (diagnosed at age 35)

Sjögren's means I live with constant fatigue, joint/ muscle pain, and brain fog. I wish people knew to be patient me. I only complain when I'm feeling really bad so know that if I'm complaining, it means I feel terrible.

Click here to learn more about how to talk with family and friends about Sjögren's.

Day 9

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Sally V., 69 (diagnosed at age 62 after 20 years of undiagnosed symptoms)

Most of my body has been affected by this disease. My best tip for Sjögren's patients is to allow yourself rest but don’t give up. And thank you to the SSF! The Foundation has changed the whole outlook for patients.

Click here to learn more about symptoms of Sjögren's.

Day 10

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Ashlyn A., 23 (diagnosed at age 21)

My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms are living with cystic lung disease, low white blood cell counts & dry eyes.

I wish people knew that it’s not easy living with a chronic disease, but I’m still me. I have cysts in my lungs, but I won’t give them to you. I want to workout, but it’s hard sometimes with my breathing. I was able to have lung surgery & then get married four months later like nothing happened. I’m still me. I’m just living with Sjögren's.

Click here to learn more about Sjögren’s-Related Lung Disease.

Day 11

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Tamika L., 40 (diagnosed at 32)

I wish people understood that Sjögren’s can affect the entire body. Although this disease seems invisibles to others, don’t ignore symptoms. Stay educated & take charge of your health!

Click here to learn more about how to be your own best patient advocate by gaining a thorough understanding of Sjögren's and signing up as an SSF member to receive our patient newsletter, The Moisture Seekers.

Day 12

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Grace K., 18 (diagnosed at age 17)

Brain fog is one of my most difficult Sjögren's symptoms. I find myself constantly forgetting things & often stare off for long periods of time, but this disease does not define who I am. Eliminating gluten & dairy from my diet has helped me manage my symptoms.

Click here to view resources about chronic illness and diet, like “Grain Brain,” in the SSF bookstore.

Day 13

Kelly Day 13

Kelly P., 50 (diagnosed at 46 after 8 years of being misdiagnosed) 

Sjögren’s means I live with fatigue, neuropathy, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and migraines. If you know someone with Sjögren’s, offer your time or lend a hand because while many symptoms are invisible, we still need support.

Click here below to learn more about headaches and Sjögren's.

Day 14

Kiana T Day 14

Kiana T., 30 (diagnosed at 23)

My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms are inflammation in my fingers, chronic pain throughout my body and brain fog.

Click here to learn more about chronic pain & Sjögren's.

Day 15 

Daty 15 Roger

Roger T., 50 (diagnosed at 48)

My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms are joint pain, burning muscles, dry eyes and dry mouth.

Sjögren's is often described as a disease that mostly affects women and causes dry eyes & mouth, but people don’t realize it also affects men and a person’s whole body. I have difficulty walking because of numbness/burning in my toes and legs.

Click here to learn more about peripheral neuropathy and Sjögren's.

Day 16 

Yvette Day 16

Yvette Y., 42 (diagnosed at 28)
 
Sjögren’s means living with tooth decay, joint pain, fatigue and having to explain what your disease is to everyone. It’s discouraging to be in the ER and need to describe Sjögren’s to your doctors/nurses. My best tip is to keep talking about the disease. Our pain, our story connects us and that helps.
 
 
Day 17 
 
Day 17
 
Jeri J., 29 (diagnosed at 28)
 
My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms are extreme fatigue, dry mouth and dry eyes.
 
As a basketball coach, it’s hard to manage fatigue that can’t be “pushed through,” like the athletic world teaches. My best Sjögren's tip is to make boundaries and stick to them. The health risks of letting yourself get run down isn’t worth it.
 
 
 
 

 

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Topics: April Awareness Month, #ThisIsSjögrens

Sjögren's Awareness Month 2019!

Posted on Mon, Apr 01, 2019

Conquering Sjögren's

#ThisIsSjögrens 

April is Sjögren’s Awareness Month!  Sjögren’s is one of the most prevalent but still lesser known autoimmune diseases. It is also not a “cookie cutter” disease and affects patients differently. This can lead to a misunderstanding about the seriousness of the disease and be extremely isolating for those living with it.

Using our new 2019 theme, Conquering the Complexities of Sjögren's, we are going to expand our #ThisIsSjögrensonline campaign. We will post every day in April, using one or more of our social media channels, to create a better understanding of the disease. While the daily posts will each give one small glimpse into living with Sjögren’s, by the end of April, we hope these 30 posts will help others visualize the vast impact of the disease.

Help us conquer the complexities of Sjögren's this April because every day is an opportunity to start a conversation about Sjögren’s and how it affects you. The more others understand, the more support you can find. 

2019_FB_Frame_02Get Involved!


Day 1
Candi 2019 April

Candi B., 46 (diagnosed at 43), Disabled (Former payroll manger)

My most difficult Sjögren's symptoms is living with 49% lung function. I wish people knew how dangerous it is to call this only a “dry eye and dry mouth disease.” Remember to advocate for your health before this disease becomes fatal. #ThisIsSjögrens

Click here to view our daily  April Awareness campaign on Facebook!

If you do not use social media, click here to view the daily posts.

                                             

Topics: Sjögren’s Awareness Month,, April Awareness Month, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

It's almost Sjögren's Awareness Month!

Posted on Fri, Mar 15, 2019

Conquering Sjögren's

#ThisIsSjögrens 

April is Sjögren's Awareness Month and we hope you will join us in educating the public about this complex disease and how it affects those who are living with it. Even though Sjögren’s awareness continues to rise, it is still one of the most prevalent but lesser known autoimmune diseases. This can lead to a misunderstanding about the seriousness of the disease.

Using our new 2019 theme, Conquering the Complexities of Sjögren's, we are going to expand our #ThisIsSjögrens social media campaign to help others visualize what it is like for patients living with the disease.   

We will post every day in April, using one or more of our social media channels, to create a better understanding of the disease. To help portray the entire patient experience, the SSF will be using Sjögren's facts along with real patient stories to help close the gap between the reality of Sjögren’s and the perception that many non-patients have. 

Help us conquer the complexities of Sjögren's this April by following our #ThisIsSjögrens social media posts. While the daily posts will each give one small glimpse into living with Sjögren’s, by the end of April we hope these 30 posts will shine a light on Sjögren’s and ensure a greater understanding of this disease.

Let Your Voice Be Heard!

SSF This Is Sjogren'sIf you would like you and your story can be featured in this year's campaign, please email us your answers from the questionnaire below and a picture of yourself, to tms@sjogrens.org with the subject line: “April Awareness Month 2019.” 30 stories will be featured in this year's campaign. 

 


#ThisIsSjögrens 2019 Questionnaire
(Please email your answers and a picture of yourself to tms@sjogrens.org.) April FB Frame

Name (The Foundation will only publish first names):

Email: 

Current age: 

Age when diagnosed (or What is your connection to the disease):

City/State:

How would you describe yourself in one word (teacher, graphic designer, stay at home parent): 

What are your top three most difficult symptoms to live with:

What is your most difficult symptom that people don't understand: 

What do you wish people knew about your Sjögren’s: 

What’s your best Sjögren’s tip: 

Don’t forget to include a picture of yourself!

                                             

Topics: Sjögren’s Awareness Month,, April Awareness Month, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

15 Types of Sjögren’s Fatigue

Posted on Thu, Jan 03, 2019

Fatigue

by Teri Rumpf, Ph.D.

This is the second revival of an essay I wrote fifteen years ago, originally entitled 11 Types of Fatigue. Once again, I’ve been asked by the Sjögren’s Foundation to give it new life. I thank them for the opportunity and hope that in the fifteen years that have passed since the original essay, there is increased acknowledgment of fatigue as a major factor in Sjögren’s and a growing knowledge that Sjögren’s is a systemic disease. My list of fatigue now numbers fifteen different subtypes. It is by no means meant to be exhaustive…. the bulk of the article remains the same as it did in both 2003 and 2013.

A quick update: The friend mentioned below was my first friend with Sjögren’s and as such, has always been very special to me. We still speak in a kind of shorthand, as I do with most if not all of my Sjögren’s friends. The friends I have made over the years are the best outcome of this disease. As a group, we understand what it means to say that we are “fine.”  We know that when we say we are “tired,” it means really tired, i.e. that something is going on, something out of the ordinary, beyond the everyday feelings of fatigue. “How are you?” is not a question in our general culture. It is a greeting. As such, it deserves a real answer only in those circumstances where there is an understanding that the person asking truly wants to know. 

For those of you who haven’t seen it, here is most of the original article with a few additions and revisions:

"How are you?" I asked a friend who has Sjögren’s. "Tired," she said, "how are you?" "Tired," I replied, knowing we understood each other. We were talking about a special brand of fatigue. Later that day, a friend who did not have Sjögren’s asked me the same question. "How are you?" she said. "Fine" I responded, thinking it was the simpler way to answer a basically rhetorical question.

Not everyone with Sjögren’s suffers from fatigue, but many of us do. According to the 2016 Living with Sjögren’s survey done by the SSF, fatigue was the third most prevalent and disabling symptom of Sjögren’s. For me, fatigue has been a problem more disabling than dry eyes or dry mouth. I long for normal energy and the ability to sustain activity, any activity. I long for the kind of fatigue that gets better with a good night's sleep. I want to be able to do things spontaneously. I wish I did not have to pace myself or plan rest stops. I wish that I could just get up and go, but, reluctantly and somewhat resentfully, I know that fatigue is a permanent part of my life. Having decided that if you must live in a particular landscape, you should learn the subtleties of the territory. I've come up with the following subtypes. Your experience may vary:

  1. Basic fatigue: This is the inherent fatigue that I attribute to the inflammatory, autoimmune nature of Sjögren’s. It's with me all the time. It differs from normal fatigue in that you don't have to do anything to deserve it. It can vary from day to day but is always there. For me, there appears to be a correlation between this kind of fatigue and sed rate (ESR). When one goes up, so does the other. I don’t know how often this phenomenon occurs. I could also call this my baseline fatigue, which fluctuates and gets better or worse. All of the following are superimposed on this basic fatigue.

  2. Rebound fatigue: If I push myself too far and ignore the cues my body is sending me to stop and rest, my body will fight back. When I do more than I should, the result is an immobilizing fatigue. It comes on after the fact, i.e., do too much one day and feel it the next. If I push myself today, I very likely will have to cancel everything tomorrow. An extended period of doing more than I should will almost certainly cause a flare.

  3. Sudden fatigue: This 'crumple and fold' phenomenon makes me resemble a piece of laundry. It comes on suddenly, and I have to stop whatever I'm doing and just sit down (as soon as I can). It can happen anywhere, at any time. It is the kind of fatigue that makes me shut off the computer in mid-sentence. It is visible to those who are observant and know what to look for, even though I make gargantuan efforts to disguise the fact that it is happening.

  4. Weather related fatigue: Not everyone has this particular talent, but I can tell that the barometric pressure is dropping while the sky remains blue and cloudless. I feel a sweeping wave, a malaise, that sometimes lifts just after the rain or snow has started. Likewise, I know when a weather front is moving away, even while torrents of water are falling from the sky. I feel a lightening in my body and begin to have more energy. This kind of fatigue is accompanied by an increase in muscle aches and joint pain.

  5. Molten lead phenomenon: This fatigue is present when I open my eyes in the morning and know that it is going to be a particularly bad day. It feels as if someone has poured molten lead in my head and on all my limbs while I slept. My muscles and joints hurt and doing anything is like walking with heavy weights. It is often associated with increased symptoms of fibromyalgia and sometimes helped by heat and massage.

  6. Tired-wired: Tired-wired is a feeling that comes from certain medications, such as prednisone, too much caffeine, or too much excitement or perhaps it is just a function of Sjögren’s. My body is tired, but my mind wants to keep gong and won’t let my body rest.

  7. Flare-related fatigue: Flare-related fatigue is an unpredictable state of increased fatigue that can last for days or weeks. It may be caused by an increase in disease activity or an undetected infection. If the latter, it either resolves on its own, or eventually presents other signs and symptoms that can be diagnosed. Additional rest is essential to deal with this kind of fatigue, but rest alone will not necessarily improve it or make it go away. Once a flare begins, it is impossible to predict where it will go or how long it will last.

  8. Fatigue related to other physical causes: Fatigue related to other physical causes, such as thyroid problems or anemia or other diseases superimposed on Sjögren’s. This kind of fatigue makes you feel that you are climbing a steep hill when you are really walking on level ground. It may resolve once the underlying organic condition is diagnosed and treated. Thyroid problems and anemia are both common among Sjögren’s patients, but many other kinds of fatigue may be superimposed. Sjögren’s and fibromyalgia often co-exist, such that it is difficult to separate one from the other.

  9. Fatigue impairs concentration: Fatigue impairs concentration, precludes thought, and makes me too tired to talk, think or read. Fatigue robs me of memory and encloses me in a fog of cotton wool so thick I can't find my way out until the fog miraculously lifts. For me, brain fog goes hand-in-hand with other kinds of pernicious fatigue.

  10. Stress, distress, anxiety or depression: Stress, distress, anxiety or depression all can create a leaden kind of emotional fatigue that can be as exhausting as one due to physical causes. Although some people do not associate their increased fatigue with emotional states, many are aware of the effects of increased anxiety and depression, even if they cannot control what they feel. Intense emotion is very draining. Stress, anxiety and depression all are known to disrupt sleep.

  11. Fatigue that comes from not sleeping well: Some people with Sjögren’s have trouble both getting to sleep and staying asleep. Some wake up in the morning feeling as if they had never slept at all. Many aspects of Sjögren’s affect sleep: being too dry, in too much pain or malaise; multiple trips to the bathroom, the need for water or to put in eye ointment all deter a good sleep. Lack of restorative sleep increases fatigue. Fibromyalgia worsens when you don’t get a good night’s sleep. Chronic pain increases fatigue.

  12. Fatigue that comes with normal aging: I’m old enough for Medicare now and my friends are more tired too, although they seem to be able to do two or three or even four times what I can do on any given day. In fact, the gap between what they can do and what I can do just seems to be growing, despite my best efforts. It’s been a long time since I tried to keep up, but it still hurts that I can’t.

  13. Fatigue that comes from a chronic illness that just won’t quit: We’ve all heard the expression “sick and tired of being sick and tired” and that phrase truly captures what many of us feel. I would take it one step further. There’s a fatigue that comes with the uncertainty of a chronic disease. It’s a debilitating fatigue born of never knowing what will come next. The chronicity of Sjögren’s can wear me down and I have to make special attempts not to let it. When these attempts don’t work, I wait a while and try to find something else that distracts me from my illness.

    And two new ones:

  14. Fatigue that comes from trying to keep up with family and friends who don’t have a chronic illness: As much as I try, it just isn’t possible to keep up. I’m on a schedule that’s all my own, and as much as I fight it, it separates me from the people I love. I’m willing to compromise to do things their way, but my body won’t cooperate.

  15. Doctor Fatigue: I get very tired of spending my time in waiting rooms, having lab tests, and going to doctors. I don’t understand why I didn’t say this before. I’m sure it’s self-explanatory. Enough said.

It's difficult to explain the unnatural quality and intensity of Sjögren’s fatigue to someone whose only experience has been with what is normal. We're not talking about the same stuff. It’s apples and artichokes. Sjögren’s fatigue assaults everything I do. There isn’t a part of my life that hasn’t been touched by it. It is there even on my happiest days.

Because people don’t understand, it’s often misinterpreted. "Is it depression?" a health care professional who didn't know much about Sjögren’s asked me. I tensed. Was he saying it was all in my head? I began to get angry but then gave him the benefit of the doubt. I put my first reaction aside and decided he was trying to understand. I was relating something outside his frame of reference, and he was attempting to find a point with which he could identify.

When you describe Sjögren’s fatigue to someone who has never experienced it, you are asking him or her to think outside the box. You want them to understand an experience that is common to those who have Sjögren’s and many other autoimmune diseases but rare otherwise. Perhaps their first reaction will be negation or denial. While it’s always difficult to encounter expressions of disbelief, it is not uncommon.  I tried to see it as an opportunity to educate.

September TMS-1"No," I said to the doctor who asked about depression, "think of it as a never-ending flu that varies in intensity but never goes away." He grimaced.

This article was first published in the September Issue of The Moisture Seekers. Suggested reading: The Sjögren’s Syndrome Survival Guide, by Terri Rumpf, PhD, author of the "15 Types of Fatigue" article, and Katherine Moreland Hammitt, SSF Vice President of Medical & Scientific Affairs, this SSF best seller is often referred to as a “support group in a book."

Click here to view a sample issue of the newsletter.  If you’re not already a member of the SSF, please considering joining and providing the Foundation with one more voice to increase awareness, educate others, and encourage research – all of which help in the fight to conquer Sjögren's.

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Topics: Depression, Brain Fog, Fatigue, Flare,, #ThisIsSjögrens, Fibromyalgia, Sjögren’s

Celebrating 35 Years!

Posted on Wed, Sep 19, 2018

Elaine September marks the 35th Anniversary of the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) that was founded by Elaine K. Harris, a frustrated patient determined to learn more about her disease. During the SSF’s first year, Elaine held support group meetings in her home and wrote The Moisture Seekers, the Foundation’s patient newsletter, on her typewriter.  She then slowly grew that support group into the SSF.

Today, in her 90s, Elaine still remains an important force in the eyes of the SSF.  Her mantra of "founded by a patient, for patients” remains the center of what we do. While the Foundation has always been a patient focused organization, it has grown from a “Mom & Pop” operation that was started 35 years ago into an internationally recognized organization shaping the industry in terms of research, education, patient care, advocacy and new therapies.

Elaine NYC

The SSF staff and our hundreds of volunteers, work hard to ensure that the patient voice is never lost in our discussions nor plans. And our accomplishments speak volumes for how we are changing Sjögren’s for our patients. We are working diligently on the development of new therapeutics to treat Sjögren’s and have published the first-ever Clinical Practice Guidelines in Sjögren’s! These guidelines are starting to provide a roadmap for physicians and dentists to use when treating their patients.

And probably one of the biggest accomplishments in the past 5 years, is the SSF’s achievement of our 5-Year Breakthrough Goal – to reduce the time to diagnose Sjögren’s by 50%!  When we set that goal in 2012, it took nearly 6 years to receive a proper diagnosis, and we are proud to say that, in 2017, we were able to announce that we exceeded our goal and have reduced that time to 2.8 years!

Elaine Harris Sjögren’s is finally receiving the recognition and appreciation it deserves. Although not to the level we need it to be, we are seeing more and more physicians step up to learn about Sjögren’s, while more and more families of patients are starting to get involved with the SSF. 

We are also seeing more interest from pharmaceutical companies than ever before, all interested in helping us to find a new treatment to help our patients!  A treatment that will help fight the entire disease, not just one symptom.

Happy Anniversary SSF and here is to another 35 years!

Steve and Elaine

 

 

Support the vision that Elaine K. Harris  had 35 years ago and all Sjögren’s patients by  becoming an SSF member!

Help us celebrate 35 years of helping all Sjögren’s patients!

Topics: Advocacy, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

Celebrating our Future!

Posted on Wed, Aug 01, 2018

Celebrating the future of the SSF!

SSF This Is Sjogren'sThis past July 23rd, the Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation (SSF) joined with organizations around the world to celebrate the 8th annual World Sjögren's Day and what would have been Dr. Sjögren's 119th birthday. World Sjögren's Day commemorates the birthday of Henrik Sjögren, the ophthalmologist who first discovered the disease in 1933, which has helped all patients find answers to their health questions.

More importantly, celebrating this day allows us to reflect back on the incredible advancements recently made in Sjögren's and look to the future at all the work that still lies ahead.

With millions of patients suffering around the world, Sjögren's is one of the most prevalent autoimmune diseases but it is not a “cookie cutter” disease and affects patients differently. The complexity of Sjögren’s can be seen in the various types of treatments and care needed for patients.  Its complexity is also seen in the progress the SSF still needs to make.

Every day the SSF strives to represent your voice and provide hope to patients and their families through our many initiatives.  Every program and project is evaluated with the patient in mind, which is why we want to hear from you!

Let your voice be heard!

In honor of this past World Sjögren’s Day, we encourage you to share with us your views of the SSF and how you envision the future. Let your voice be heard and comment below with your thoughts on the following SSF questionnaire.


Questionnaire:

Celebrating the future of the SSF and hope for Sjögren’s

(Please share your answers below or email them to tms@sjogrens.org)  

  • What SSF resource(s) are you the most thankful for:
  • What are the three most important focuses of the SSF:
  • In the next five years, how do you envision your future (or that of a loved one) living with the disease:
  • What are your hopes for the future of Sjögren’s for the next generation:

faces all

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Topics: World Sjogren's Day, Advocacy, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

Thank You for Celebrating World Sjögren's Day!

Posted on Tue, Jul 24, 2018

WorldSjogrensDay_logoThis past Monday, July 23rd, people from around the world joined together in recognizing World Sjögren's Day. The Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation was truly moved by the number of donations we received, the amount of Sjögren's fact sheets downloaded, and all of the encouraging posts that were shared on social media. It was a very successful day that brought a great deal of awareness for the disease.

Just because World Sjögren's Day has now passed though, it doesn't mean that the fight ends. While it certainly made an impact, one day alone of increasing awareness and raising much needed funds is not enough. There is still time to make a donation in honor of World Sjögren's Day. You can also donate in honor of a loved one or in honor of the millions of people living with the disease. Additionally, you can still download the Sjögren's fact sheet to help you 
rsz_circle_of_strength_bracelet_chain_cropped
increase awareness. You never know when the opportunity to share information about Sjögren's may arise and we encourage you to do so whenever you have the chance.
 
To change the future of Sjögren's — to achieve the very first therapeutic specifically for Sjögren's, to provide healthcare professionals with guidelines to properly treat patients, to educate patients and give them the support they need to best deal with their disease — we must continue to work together. Your support is invaluable in helping to transform the future of Sjögren's.
 

The SSF appreciates any efforts you can make throughout
the year to help every day feel like World Sjögren's Day!

Sincerely,

Steve_Sig
Steven Taylor
Chief Executive Officer
 
Make a Donation Now

Topics: World Sjogren's Day, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

World Sjögren's Day 2018

Posted on Mon, Jul 09, 2018

While World Sjögren's Day commemorates the birthday of Henrik Sjögren, a Swedish ophthalmologist who first identified the disease in 1933, it is more importantly a way to help raise awareness for Sjögren's. It is meant to put a face on the millions of people who live with this disease or suffer from symptoms and have yet to be diagnosed. It gives everyone touched by Sjögren's a vehicle to reach out and educate those close to them - family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, etc. - about the disease. It is the ideal opportunity for you to have your voice heard and to spread awareness about this life-altering disease.

Leading up to World Sjögren's Day and especially on the day itself, we encourage you to use this opportunity to let your voice heard and talk about Sjögren’s with the people in your life. By sharing your story and educating others, you are helping to form the message that Sjögren's is a serious disease that deserves to be recognized. You may also be helping someone who is looking for answers to their problems.

How Can You Get Involved:

WSD 2018

What is Sjögren’s?

Sjögren’s (“SHOW-grins”) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects the entire body. Along with symptoms of extensive dryness, other serious complications include profound fatigue, chronic pain, major organ involvement, neuropathies and lymphomas.

Today, as many as four million Americans are living with this disease and nine out of ten patients are women with an average age of onset in the late 40’s. However, Sjögren’s can occur in all age groups, even in children.

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Topics: World Sjogren's Day, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

April is Sjögren's Awareness Month!

Posted on Sun, Apr 01, 2018

30 Faces for Sjögren's Awareness Month!

With an estimated 4 million Americans suffering from Sjögren’s, both men and women of different ages and ethnicities, it is one of the most prevalent but lesser known autoimmune diseases. Sjögren’s is also not a “cookie cutter” disease and affects patients differently. This can lead to a misunderstanding about the seriousness of the disease and be extremely isolating for those living with it. 

Apriil SSF 2017

April is Sjögren's Awareness Month and using our 2018 campaign, “30 Faces for Sjögren’s Awareness Month,” we hope to help others visualize the vast impact of the disease.  Every day in April, we will be using one or more of our social media channels to educate people about Sjögren’s.

We encourage you to use April Awareness Month and our #ThisIsSjögrens social media campaign, as a way to talk about Sjögren’s. Every post is an opportunity to start a conversation about living with Sjögren’s and how it affects you. The more others understand, the more support you can find. And know that we at the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation are here for you!

Get Involved!

On behalf of the millions of patients living with Sjögren's, thank you for your support of the SSF and our mission. Together we are transforming the future of Sjögren's for all patients!

Click here to view our daily  April Awareness campaign on Facebook!
 

 this is sjogrens - 2018

Sjögren’s (“SHOW-grins”) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects the entire body. Along with symptoms of extensive dryness, other serious complications include profound fatigue, chronic pain, major organ involvement, neuropathies, and lymphomas.

Topics: Advocacy, April Awareness Month, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

30 Faces for Sjögren’s Awareness Month 

Posted on Fri, Mar 16, 2018

AprilisSjogrensAwarenessMonth.jpg

30 Faces for Sjögren’s Awareness Month

#ThisIsSjögrens
 

With an estimated 4 million Americans living with Sjögren’s, it is one of the most prevalent but lesser known autoimmune diseases. This can lead to a misunderstanding about the seriousness of the disease and be extremely isolating for those living with it. 

April is Sjögren's Awareness Month and we hope you will join us in educating the public about this complex and debilitating disease. With our 2018 campaign, “30 Faces for Sjögren’s Awareness Month,” we hope to help others visualize the vast impact of the disease. Using the #ThisIsSjögrens hashtag, the SSF will highlight 30 people’s photos, along with a fact about how the disease affects his/her life.

Every day in April, the Foundation will post a different photo of someone who is living with Sjögren's or touched by the disease (you can be a patient, family member, friend, physician, researcher etc.). Along with the photo, we will include one fact from their #ThisIsSjögrens Questionnaire on our social media pages.

The 30 daily posts will each give one small glimpse into the disease, and by the end of April, we hope the collection of posts will show the seriousness and complexity of Sjögren’s.

Let Your Voice Be Heard!

SSF This Is Sjogren's.png

If you would like to submit your story as one of our “30 Faces for April Awareness Campaign” please email us your answers from the questionnaire below, and a picture of yourself, to tms@sjogrens.org with the subject line: “April Awareness Month 2018.”

Thank you for your support. Together we will make Sjögren’s a household name!


#ThisIsSjögrens Questionnaire
(Please email your answers and a picture of yourself to tms@sjogrens.org.) 

Name (The Foundation will only publish first names):

Email: 

Current age: 

Age when diagnosed (or What is your connection to the disease):

City/State:

How would you describe yourself in one word (teacher, graphic designer, stay at home parent): 

What are your top three most difficult symptoms to live with:

What do you wish people knew about your Sjögren’s: 

What’s your best Sjögren’s tip: 

Don’t forget to include a picture of yourself!

 

Topics: Advocacy, April Awareness Month, #ThisIsSjögrens, Sjögren’s

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