Symptoms of Dryness

5 Tips for Dry and Brittle Nails

Posted on Fri, Aug 22, 2014

Brittle nails are characterized by hardness, peeling, crumbling, fissures, excess longitudinal ridges or lack of flexibility of the finger and toe nails. This sometimes causes pain and interferes with normal daily activities.

Many different dermatologic conditions including some autoimmune disorders, infections, dryness and certain medications can affect the nails.

Here are some tips to help:

  1. Keep the nails short. This prevents the nails from catching on things or acting as a lever and causing further damage.
  2. Protect the nails when performing wet work (like washing dishes) by using rubber gloves and cotton glove liners.
  3. Avoid excess contact with water or chemicals (including nail polish remover) which can cause dryness.
  4. Use moisturizer on your nails multiple times per day and reapply the moisturizer after your hands come in contact with water. You can use the same moisturizer used for your dry skin.
  5. Steer clear of cosmetic products such as artificial nails and nail wraps which can cause damage.

Talk to your Dermatologist:

Nails pic 2  * If your dermatologist approves, try a course of biotin for your have brittle nails.
 
  * If you're diagnosed with a fungal infection of your nails, your dermatologist can discuss a variety of treatment options which are available.

Are your Dry & Brittle Nails associated with Sjögren’s? Do you also have Dry Eyes, Joint Pain or Fatigue? Click here to learn more

The SSF thanks Adam I. Rubin, MD for authoring these tips. Dr. Rubin is Director of the Nail Practice & Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Perleman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Topics: Dry Mouth, Dry Eyes, Symptoms, Sjogren's, Joint Pain, Fatigue, Treatment, Dry Skin, Top 5 Tips, Dry Nails, Makeup Tips

Ask the Eye Doctor: Why do my dry eyes hurt in the morning?

Posted on Tue, Jul 22, 2014

Q) Why do dry eyes feel awful in the morning when I first wake up, especially if I don’t use an eye lubricant at night?

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A) There are certain conditions that can get worse during the night with the eye in a closed state. For example, if you have blepharitis, which is caused by a common skin bacteria called “staph epidermidis,” the waste products of the staph are very irritating. But with your eye closed that staph toxin is lying there all night. If I have a patient who wakes up with really irritated eyes, one of the first things I want to look at is untreated blepharitis.

Another possible cause is called “recurrent corneal erosion.” Think about pulling a scab off all the time. It starts to heal and you pull the scab off. If the surface of the eye gets irritated through dryness and adherence to the back of the lid, or through an injury, that tissue needs to heal. The good news is it heals very quickly. The bad news is it hurts a lot as I’m sure you’ve found. So it heals quickly but it doesn’t necessarily anchor itself. That thin, outer layer of the cornea doesn’t anchor itself to the eye very fast, so you run the risk of re- irritating your eye even after you are feeling better. And when you do that over-and-over, it is called “recurrent corneal erosion.” You are basically tearing off the outer layer of the front of your eye. Classic sign is you wake up, you open your eyes and it hurts. Using ointments at night helps. Using an antibiotic ointment would help if you have blepharitis as well because it would treat that and give your eye a little more coating.

Dry Eye Tip!
If you have severe dry eyes and trouble opening your eyes in the morning because your lid is sticking, try to keep your eyes closed when you wake up and use the heels of your hands to gently massage your lids. What this will do is break any of those adhesions that may be there and it stimulates a little tear production so that you can actually open up your eye safely. But if you wake up and open up your eyes right away, you run the risk of – ouch – pulling that adhesion off, again, like pulling a scab off of a wound.

-Stephen Cohen, OD from his talk on Dry Eye

Is your Dry Mouth associated with Sjögren’s- Do you also have Dry Eyes, Joint Pain or Fatigue? Click here to learn more.

Topics: Dry Mouth, Dry Eyes, Joint Pain, Fatigue, Treatment, Blepharitis

Top 10 Tips for Burning Mouth from Oral Candidiasis (Thrush)

Posted on Wed, May 28, 2014

Oral candidiasis, or thrush, is a common problem in dry mouth patients.

Thrush can cause oral burning and pain. The appearance of thrush in a dry mouth patient is often atypical and appears as red and irritated instead of the typical white cottage-cheesy. The tongue may show grooves, and the corners of the lips appear red and crusty (called angular cheilitis). Here are 10 tips that can help manage & treat oral thursh:

  1. Practice excellent oral hygiene and change your toothbrush frequently when oral candidiasis is active.

  2. Talk to your dentist or rheumatologist about taking Evoxac® (cevimilene) or Salagen® (pilocarpine) to increase salivary flow.

  3. Don’t use mouthwashes containing alcohol.

  4. Limit sugar and foods that contain yeast, such as wine, beer and bread. And increase your intake of acidophilus through unsweetened yogurts with live lactobacillus acidophilus or capsules.

  5. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, both of which can increase dryness.

  6. Sip water frequently and rinse after eating or drinking if you can’t brush.

  7. If you smoke, STOP!

  8. Clean dental prostheses every day with an anti-fungal preparation and avoid wearing them at night.

  9. Talk to your dentist about prescription therapies available to help with oral candidiasis. Sometimes a combination of treatments is necessary if the problem is severe.

  10. For maintenance once thrush is under control, discuss with your dentist frequent use of a magic mouthwash with diphenhydramine, nystatin and Maalox. A chlorhexidine gluconate rinse can also be helpful (and if you wear dentures, it’s good for cleaning those too).
Is your Dry Mouth & Thrush associated with Sjögren’s? Do you also have Dry Eyes, Joint Pain or Fatigue? Click here to learn more

Check the Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation's Product Directory (free of charge to all SSF members) to see the many products available for dry mouth.

This information was taken from the SSF Patient Education Sheet: Oral Candidiasis (Thrush) authored by Nelson L. Rhodus, DMD, MPH, FICD. Dr. Rhodus is Professor and Director, Division of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry Adjunct Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Click Here to view the full SSF Patient Education Sheet: Oral Candidiasis (Thrush)

Topics: Dry Mouth, Dry Eyes, Symptoms, Sjogren's, Joint Pain, Fatigue, Tooth Decay, Treatment, Saliva, Oral Candidiasis, Thrush, Burning mouth, coping with sjogren's, Chronic Pain

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